Roundtable: Reproducibility and a Stricter Threshold for Statistical Significance

October 27, 2017

 


The International Methods Colloquium hosted a roundtable discussion on reproducibility and a recent proposal to impose a stricter threshold for statistical significance on October 27, 2017.

The discussion is motivated by a paper, "Redefine statistical significance," recently published in Nature Human Behavior (available at this link). Panel participants include:

Daniel Benjamin, Associate Research Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California and a primary co-author of the paper "Redefine statistical significance" in Nature Human Behavior, as well as many other articles on inference and hypothesis testing in the social sciences.

Daniel Lakens, Assistant Professor in Applied Cognitive Psychology at Eindhoven University of Technology and an author or co-author on many articles on statistical inference in the social sciences, including the Open Science Collaboration's recent Science publication, "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science" (available at this link). Daniel is also lead author of the pre-print "Justify Your Alpha", a response to "Redefine statistical significance" (available at this link).

Blake McShane, Associate Professor of Marketing at Northwestern University and a co-author of the recent paper "Abandon Statistical Significance," as well as many other articles on statistical inference and replicability.

Jennifer Tackett, Associate Professor of Psychology at Northwestern University and a co-author of the recent paper "Abandon Statistical Significance," who specializes in childhood and adolescent psychopathology.

E.J. Wagenmakers, Professor at the Methodology Unit of the Department of Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, a co-author of the paper in Nature Human Behavior and author or co-author of many other articles concerning statistical inference in the social sciences, including a meta-analysis of the "power pose" effect (available at this link).

Justin Esarey, Associate Professor of Political Science at Rice University, author of "Lowering the threshold of statistical significance to p < 0.005 to encourage enriched theories of politics" in The Political Methodologist (available at this link) and "Does Peer Review Identify the Best Papers?" in PS: Political Science and Politics (available here).

Please reload

Search By Tags
Recent Posts
Please reload

Archive
Please reload

This material is based upon work supported by Wake Forest University and previously supported by Rice University and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. SES-1423825.

 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.